Category Archives: Arts & Culture

Spaces and Reservations

(Courtesy Brendan Prost)

(Courtesy Brendan Prost)

VANCOUVER (LINK MAGAZINE) – Vancouver has been fighting to keep its Hollywood North title, with tax credit cuts and special effects studio closures contributing to the anxieties in the local filmmaking community. Such droughts in the industry normally correspond to a drop in newcomers interested in learning the craft. However, for those who are making their debut in the Vancouver film arts, the situation may not look as bleak.

The Lower Mainland houses many established film schools, with Langara, Simon Fraser and Emily Carr offering competitive training programs. One student filmmaker has shared the experience of making a feature film without the budget or the manpower of Hollywood giants.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Arts & Culture, Film talk

Burnaby Art Gallery adds a touch of art to every day routine

Haydn Thomas' artwork is partly inspired by patterns he was surrounded by in his childhood. (Courtesy Harry Booth)

Haydn Thomas’ artwork is partly inspired by patterns he was surrounded by in his childhood. (Courtesy Harry Booth)

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of every day life,” Pablo Picasso once said.

Residents of the Lower Mainland are surrounded by local art in their daily routines: on SkyTrain platforms, downtown street corners, and on the walls of numerous coffee shops.

Burnaby Art Gallery found a new way to share art in its community. The gallery has made it a tradition to display art in public libraries, adding a touch of aesthetic beauty to a place of knowledge.

Three offsite exhibitions have been launched at the Burnaby libraries in November: The Natural Numeral at McGill; Rare Books at Tommy Douglas; and ESC CTRL at the Bob Prittie library. While the first two exhibitions draw from the gallery’s permanent collections, ESC CTRL displays some of the works of the local artist Haydn Thomas for the first time.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Arts & Culture

Watermark takes a novel perspective on Earth’s most precious resource

Watermark tells the story of human interaction with water in over 20 countries. (Courtesy Mongrel Media)

Watermark tells the story of human interaction with water in over 20 countries. (Courtesy Mongrel Media)

VANCOUVER (THE LINK) –  “We are water.”

If there was a concise way to summarize Watermark, this quote from Oscar Dennis comes pretty close. Words do a poor job of describing a film of such overwhelming visual beauty, but the Tahltan linguist captured the simple and yet loudest message of the film.

Watermark is the second cinematic collaboration between Canadian director Jennifer Baichwal and photographer Edward Burtynsky. In its ninety-minute run, Watermark takes the viewers on an aquatic journey from the Colorado River Delta, to a dam in China, and back home – floating down Stikine River in British Columbia.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Arts & Culture, Film talk, Reviews